Super Sons #9 Review

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Posted October 19, 2017 by Aron Pohara in Comic Books

Written by: Peter Tomasi

Art by: Jorge Jimenez and Carmine Di Giandomenico

Published by:  DC Comics

I honestly believe “heck yeah” should become Jon’s new catchphrase!

This seems to be the end to the “Planet of the Capes,” story and it certainly is with a bang. The whole issue is full of humor, action, and just overall hijinks. Tomasi is still able to surprise us with the layers of relationship between Damian and Jon, showing us just how alike they really are. They both benefit from each other’s actions. That relationship continues to be the solid center of this book, and if nothing, is reason to continue reading Super Sons.

This particular arc introduced us to another interesting villain who was really one of the old obscure villains for Justice League–Kraklow. Tomasi manages to write him like most of his characters, with a ton of heart so that he does not seem one-dimensional. That is one of great success of this book, that Tomasi is able to make D-list villains interesting while also making sure they’re villains Damien and Jon can handle.

Jorge Jimenez here is joined with Flash artist Carmine Di Giandomenico whose style is vibrant; however, it does look a bit jarring going from Jimenez’ to Carmine’s. I do believe Carmine would be fantastic for a solo run, but the two art styles here are so dissimilar that it does create more of a distraction than a union.

That being said, both Jimenez and Carmine handle their respective panels to their best abilities, and the action sequences are very well represented.

Overall Super Sons continues to be one of the gems and one of the many bright spots of DC Rebirth line. It is exactly what a comic book should be; it is action packed, has humor, great characters, and sometimes enough of an emotional punch without being too sentimental.

Super Sons #9



Super Sons #9

8.7

Final Score

8.7 /10

Pros

  • Jon/Damian dynamic
  • Some great action
  • Interesting new characters!

Cons

  • Jarring art difference between two artists
  • bit of pacing



About the Author

Aron Pohara